Friday, March 31, 2017

History Be Damned

Cartoon by Davis Jaye Contact: davisjaye@aol.com


What prompted me to start this post was learning about the Ludlow Massacre on UpWorthy.

Now, granted, it's been several years since I have had a history class.  Even longer for a class on American History.  Thinking back, I believe I was in 8th grade when I first experienced an American History class.  Given that I met my now best bud of 30+ years there... don't think we paid much attention honestly.  So, it is possible I missed that chapter, or have just forgotten in my old age.  Don't remember a whole lot being taught about the Suffragette Movement, or the people that called this land mass their own before the French, or Christoper Columbus showed up, and got a little confused.


If we are to know and to understand history, in order to avoid repeating our mistakes, wouldn't it be best to pull up the carpet, and know the whole history?  Or is that really even possible? 
PLEASE CLICK ON TITLE TO SEE ENTIRE POST...

Somewhere along the line you learn that you keep on learning despite being done with formal schooling.  You also realize that that principle holds true for all other people too.  About then you figure out, that not all people choose to keep learning.  Many even hold titles that give the impression that they know more than they actually do; and if you wish to keep learning, you'd better be well versed in recognizing bulsh...

In Will Hart's "Hiding Humanity's True History," he details several examples where facts, based on research and merit, do not see much light of day if they do not meet with pre-aligned, notions.

Am I a conspiracy nut theorist?  Depends on your definition.

Are there parts of history that I don't like?  Of course:  local, city, state, country, and world;  still, I want to know.

Do I think there are certain "facts" that are not true?  Yes.  Why?  Attempts at power and control, I strongly suspect. Which leads to my thought of always ask what leads to "perception being reality,"  and always look at the motives of the "truthsayers".

In other words, I know it is possible, in some cases even probable; to take a class, in quite an array of subjects, where if the student was to give an answer that they had found to be true through research, but was not "true" according to the conventional or their tenured professor's findings; the student may not receive a passing grade; ie degree, accolades, nor the credentials to be viewed as a mind to be respected.

Don't forget the less than a story of gratitude, more of chess, history behind Thanksgiving.

If you don't think this is so, allow me to go ahead and tell you that life is always fair; and good always wins over evil.

I know that much is over my head, and I'm okay with that.  I also know the difference between believing in something, and knowing something.  I watched the following UpWorthy video about the Laniakea Supercluster, the other day and was blown away.

Don't forget the story behind, Who Cooked The Last Supper?
There'll be more thoughts on that matter,  in the future, you can be sure.

There are parts of history that cannot be denied.  There are beliefs that will never be known.  Kind of the point I think.  For faith.  No matter how may wars are fought, how many people are killed, or how many ways created to kill them; it won't change a thing.  We still will not know.  Curing diseases, ending homelessness and hunger, are things that we may be able to do, if we quit trying to prove and convince one another of things that are impossible to know.  In 50 years, efforts made toward disease and poverty, might actually make a difference.

That being said, please understand it is not my intention to belittle the importance of history.

To the contrary, the importance is ESSENTIAL.  I'm still dealing with my anger over not learning, not even hearing about Katherine Johnson in West Virginia History, or American History classes. This black woman was essential in getting John Glenn into space.  Which took place in America, when the interest in space was at its peak.  Not to mention it was also the same time as fighting for civil rights was at the forefront of America's awareness.  How did I not hear about her until Hidden Figures came out?  Talk about a role model for STEM!

Elections are right around the corner.  So, pull up the carpet, look into the candidates, and VOTE.


After all, today is tomorrow's history.



*Be sure to check out The Sadie's Project and help in making her-story!

Others you may like:
Did You See This On John Oliver?

Let's Be Clear...

Poor Chris